Contextures

Split Excel Dates and Times

If a cell contains the combined date and time, use a formula to extra the date or time in separate columns. Or, use a non-formula method.

Split Date and Time Values

If you download data into Excel, one column might have a combined date and time value. In this short video, see how to quickly split that value into separate date and time columns.

The first method uses a simple formula, and the second method is done without a formula -- just a bit of typing. The written instructions are below the video. The Video Transcript is at the end of this page

Get Date Value With Formula

If a cell contains a combined date and time, you can extract just the date value, by using the INT function. Excel stores dates as numbers, with a decimal portion representing the time.

In the screen shot below, the integer in cell B3 (42418) represents the date, and the decimal portion (.50) is the time.

if function checks for empty cell

The INT function returns just the integer portion of that number, which represents the date. In the next example, the combined date/time is in cell A2.

To get the date, enter the following formula in cell B2:  =INT(A2)

if function checks for empty cell

If the data is in a named Excel table, the formula will use structured references with the field names. In the example below, the combined date/time is in the DateTime column. Enter the following formula in the first row of the Date column (cell B2):

Date: : =INT([@DateTime])

The formula should automatically fill down to the last row in the table. After you enter the formulas, format those columns with your preferred Date and Time formats.

if function checks for empty cell

Get Time Value With Formula

If a cell contains a combined date and time, you can use the INT function to pull the time value into a separate column. Dates are stored as numbers in Excel, with the decimal portion representing the time.

To calculate the time value, subtract the date integer value from the combined date and time. The remaining decimal portion is the time. In the example below, the combined date/time is in cell A2. Enter the following formula in cell C2:

Time: =A2 - INT(A2])

if function checks for empty cell

If the data is in a named Excel table, the formula will use structured references with the field names. In the example below, the combined date/time is in the DateTime column. Enter the following formula in the first row of the Time column (cell C2):

Time: =[@DateTime]-INT([@DateTime])

The formula should automatically fill down to the last row in the table. After you enter the formulas, format those columns with your preferred Date and Time formats.

if function checks for empty cell

Get Date or Time Value Without Formula

If you're using Excel 2013 or later, you can use the Flash Fill feature to get the date or time in a separate column, without formulas.

NOTE: the dates and times entered with Flash Fill will NOT update automatically if the combined date/time cell changes -- these are static entries.

Here's how you can use Flash Fill for dates or times.

  • Type the first two dates in column B, based on the dates in column A.

if function checks for empty cell

  • Then, go to the Data tab on the Excel Ribbon, and click Flash Fill.

if function checks for empty cell

The rest of the dates should fill in, and you can use the Flash Fill options box to confirm or undo the changes.

NOTE: If Flash Fill doesn't work, click the File tab at the top of Excel, then click Options. Click the Advanced category, and in the Editing options, add a check mark to "Automatically Flash Fill"

automatically flash fill

Do the same thing to fill in the Time column -- enter the first two times, then use the Flash Fill feature to complete the list.

if function checks for empty cell

Download the Sample File

Download the sample Split Date and Time workbook

Video Transcript

Here is the transcript for the Split Date and Time video, at the top of this page.

How to Split Date and Time in Excel

If you have a file with dates and times in the same cell, we'll see two quick ways that you can separate that into date and time columns.

Split With Formulas

The first one will use a formula. So in here I'm going to click and type an equal sign.

We'll use the INT function, which is for an integer and that is going to pull the whole number from this cell, which is just the date part of the date and time.

When I press Enter we'll see a date. Now if you see a number, you can format that as a date.

Then I can select that cell, double-click on the Fill Handle, and I very quickly have all the dates.

Get the Time Value

If a date has a time attached to it, that's a decimal number.

So if it's 12 noon, it would be the date number 0.5.

So we want to just get that decimal portion, so we'll type equals the date. So that's the full member including the decimal.

And then minus the date portion, we want to subtract that full number.

So we'll use the INT bracket and click on the date. And when I press Enter, we get the time. And again, you might have to format that as time, if you're just seeing a number. And then fill that down.

Split Without Formulas

We can also pull this out without a formula. So here's another copy of the same list. And in here I'm going to just type the first two dates.

So I'll type 2/1/16 and 2/3/16.

And now we're going to use the Flash Fill. And if you're doing this with text, it would fill down automatically, usually, once we set a pattern, but for numbers or dates, it doesn't do that.

We can go to the Data tab, and click Flash Fill, and then it will suggest the rest of the dates for you.

And then you can come here and accept or undo or just leave it as is if you want to accept it.

Get the Time Value

And we can do the same thing for the time. So I'll type the first couple, and 9:32

And now again, I'll go and click Flash Fill, and it fills down the rest and they look fine to me. So I'll leave those as is.

Now those won't change if these dates change.

On the sheet where we used a formula, if we update a time or the date, because we have formulas here, those would update.

Don't Miss Our Excel Tips

Don't miss my latest Excel tips and videos! Click OK, to get my weekly newsletter with Excel tips, and links to other Excel news and resources.

Get weekly Excel tips from Debra

 


 

Related Tutorials

Split Names with Flash Fill

VLOOKUP

 

Get weekly Excel tips from Debra

 

Last updated: March 2, 2021 9:02 PM